Walking

39th Ward Trails and Bikeways Workshop

Are you a 39th Ward resident who wants to improve neighborhood trails and bikeways? Do you have ideas about how to create safe and accessible connections?

The 39th Ward -- represented by Alderman Margaret Laurino -- contains a large section of the Chicago River on the far Northwest Side. So, needless to say, it's going to be a key part of the campaign to develop a continuous Chicago River Trail.

Please join us for a community workshop with Ald. Laurino to learn about proposed projects and to share your ideas for improving trails and bike routes.

Next steps in the Chicago River Trail campaign

Can you imagine having trail access to Chicago’s diverse neighborhoods and the suburbs as a bicyclist or runner?

Did you know the Chicago River already has 13.2 miles of trails for biking and walking and that the city will complete an additional 1.7 trail miles in 2017?

We couldn’t be more excited for the next steps in the campaign to build a continuous Chicago River Trail. It's energizing to think about the river trail's potential to promote the city's cultural life. 

Imagining the Chicago River Trail in Chinatown

Creating safe and easy access to Chicago’s diverse neighborhoods and showcasing cultural assets are key goals of the River Trail campaign.  

Our plan for a Chicago River Trail is driven by the idea that more Chicago neighborhoods need better access to recreation options and healthy transportation infrastructure. 

One of the many neighborhoods in the city that would benefit from a continuous Chicago River Trail is Chinatown.

Chicago River Trail

Background

The idea of a river trail is not a new one. At least as far back as Daniel Burnham’s 1909 Plan for Chicago, concepts for riverfront promenades and other public spaces have been a part of the public discourse in Chicago.

But thanks to recent initiatives, like the City of Chicago's Our Great Rivers vision, buzz about a continuous Chicago River Trail has emerged once again.

Showing Congress Chicagoans oppose gutting transit spending

Even before President Trump released a budget blueprint featuring major cuts to transit spending, we knew it was going to be a critical year in Washington, D.C. for active transportation.

Two biking and walking developments in South Chicagoland

A new 14-mile multi-use trail is under development along Sauk Trail in the South Suburbs. The Sauk Trail Preservation Path will run through Lynwood, Sauk Village, South Chicago Heights, Park Forest, Richton Park and Steger.

All six municipalities are working with the Forest Preserve District of Cook County and Active Trans to create a plan for trail development. Initial discussions about the trail include planning for improved road crossings and connectivity between neighborhoods.

Creating a scenic Chicago River Trail

Imagine bicycling or walking along the Chicago River in the presence of beautiful trees and lush green vegetation.  Along the trail you encounter turtles and butterflies and hear birds chirping in the warm sunlight. 

Wouldn’t it be great to bicycle and run along the river in such a scenic environment?  A step toward bringing more of this vision to Chicago happened at a recent public meeting at River Park in the Albany Park neighborhood. 

A new vision for Southeast Chicago begins to take shape

Since last year, the Chicago Park District has been leading a public planning effort to connect seven existing and planned open space areas on the far South Side of Chicago.

April events on the Lakefront Trail

Active Transportation Alliance compiles a list of events happening each month along the Lakefront Trail. See what's going on in the month of April so you can better plan your walking, biking or running route. 

For more information on conditions on the Lakefront Trail, check out our Twitter page.

 

Saturday, April 8

See our suburban pop-up events in action

Last summer and fall, Active Trans partnered up with a handful of suburban Cook County municipalities to host pop-up complete streets events.

The events used everyday materials, such as duct tape, tar paper, plants and house paint to create temporary complete streets facilities – crosswalks, bicycle lanes, roundabouts and other features to slow down vehicle traffic and improve safety for people walking and bicycling.